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The STM32 ultra basic kit showing all of the components

STM32 Ultra Basic Kit Special Introductory Price!

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ST Link v2 for STM32 and STM8 microcontrollers top view of all components

ST-Link v2 STM32 and STM8 Programmer

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STM32F0 microcontroller and interface board top view

STM32 M0 MCU and Interface to Breadboard

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Top view of the bluetooth module

Bluetooth Module

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The ARM microcontroller beginners kit

ARM Microcontroller Beginners Kit (STM32F0)

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ARM Microcontroller Intermediate Kit (STM32F0)

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ARM Microcontroller Advanced Kit (STM32F0)

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USB 2.0 Cable 10 Foot Type A Male to Type B Male

USB 2.0 Cable Type A Male to Type B Male - 10 FT

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Multimeter Security Banana Plug To Test Hook Clip Probe Lead Cable 500V

Multimeter Security Banana Plug To Test Hook Clip Probe Lead Cable 500V

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02. Arduino for Production!! How to Instal and Set up the Arduino IDE (Integrated Development Environment) for the ARM Microcontroller

Install the CooCox IDE (Integrated Development Environment) where you will write the programs that will be transferred into the ARM microcontroller.

Here, I show you how to install the IDE (Integrated Development Environment). Within an IDE, the embedded program is developed, built (compiled into code that the microcontroller can understand) and flashed to the microcontroller (another way of saying, transferring the compiled code into the microcontroller so the microcontroller will do something). The IDE that is shown here has all of the features that most mature IDEs will have, including the ability to debug the program in the IDE and on the chip, color coding for enhanced readability and have a form of intellisense (a contextual helper that will give you hints on what you are typing).

The IDE that is explained in the video is relatively agnostic to ARM based microcontrollers where you can select one of various chip manufacturers that support the ARM architecture. What makes this possibile is that the IDE is really independend from the actual compiler that converts the program into the ARM microcontroller readable code. The IDE selected for this video series is the CoIDE from CooCox which has strong support from ST-Micro which is the line of ARM based microcontrollers that is used in this series. CoIDE is also free! it is an open environment. It is based on an IDE called Eclipse. By using this development environment you can connect it to the GCC compiler which is also an open source compiler so you’ll be able to write your programs without having to pay for the programming environment.

To install the CooCox IDE, go to www.CooCox.org/software.html and you’ll have a download link available. You’ll need to register before you download the software. Download the file and open it. It will ask you to accept the terms of use. Click next install the program. This will produce an icon in your folder and desktop and will launch when it finishes.


Find the Download button on the CooCox CoIDE Software page. Click the download button and you will be presented with the login and registration page.


Once you register, login and you will be able to download the CoIDE.



You will need to run the downloaded file. By pressing next on the first screen, you are agreeing to the terms of use. Click next if you have read and agree to the terms of use for the CoIDE software.


Determine where you would like the CoIDE software to be installed on your computer. Click install. If you want the desktop shortcut and a menu item in the start menu, make sure to click the check-boxes that correspond to these options.

If you want the program to run immediately, click the check box next to Launch CoIDE Dev Version right now. Click the finish button when finished.

To be able to compile the code that is developed in the CooCox IDE, you’ll need to go to https://launchpad.net/gcc-arm-embedded/+download and you’ll have a list of executable files to download.


This will install the tools that you need to compile the code that is created. I’m going to select the gcc-arm-none-eabi-##latest-version##-win32.exe file and run it.

When the file is downloaded, run the program. Select the language and press OK.
Click Yes to continue to confirm that the GNU Tools for ARM Embedded Processors will be installed on your computer.


Close all other applications so that the GNU Tools for ARM Embedded Development can be installed error free.


Click “Yes” if you “Agree to terms” then “next”.

If you want the GNU Tools for ARM Embedded Development to be installed at the default location, press next, otherwise, click browse to change the install location and then press next.

Make sure “Add path to environment variable” is checked so the tools can be accessed under any folders on the hard drive.



Click “finish” and this will show a readme file on the usage of the tools and also on specific Windows and Linux command lines. You can look at this readme by getting this particular file using Notepad.

After the GCC tools were installed, you’ll need to inform the CoID where that information is installed. Open up the CoID and go to “Project” and “Select Toolchain path”.


You’ll use “Browse” and locate the folder where it was installed and select the version number folder and it will automatically put the .bin file in.


So far we’ve installed the CoID and the GCC compiler. The only thing left to install now is our programmer driver and make sure that the programmer is able to flash the microcontroller. We will do that in the next video.


01. Arduino for Production!! Introduction to ARM Microcontrollers
02. Arduino for Production!! How to Instal and Set up the Arduino IDE (Integrated Development Environment) for the ARM Microcontroller
03. Arduino for Production!! How to Connect the ST-Link v2 ARM Programmer to your Computer
04. Arduino for Production!! How to Use the CoIDE (Adruino IDE) for ARM Microcontroller Development
05. Arduino for Production!! How to Connect the ST-Link v2 to the ARM STM32 Microcontroller
06. Arduino for Production!! How to Output to a Pin to Blink an LED on the ARM Microcontroller Part 1
07. Arduino for Production!! How to Output to a Pin to Blink an LED on the ARM Microcontroller Part 2
08. Arduino for Production!! How to Output to a Pin to Blink an LED on an ARM Microcontroller Part 3
09. Arduino for Production!! Can Not Connect to Target! How to Establish a Connection Again.
10. Arduino for Production!! How to Receive Input from a Pin for Push Button Input (GPIO) on the ARM Microcontroller
11. Arduino for Production!! How to Receive Push Button Input on the ARM Microcontroller Part 2
12. Arduino for Production!! How to Receive Stable GPIO Push Button Input on the ARM Microcontroller - Software Debouncing Part 1
13. Arduino for Production!! How to Receive Stable GPIO PUSH Button Input onthe ARM Microcontroller - Software Debouncing Part 2
14. Arduino for Production - How to Establish Software Debouncing on the ARM Microcontroller Exclusive
15. Arduino for Production!! How to Interface an LCD on the ARM Microcontroller Part 1
16. Arduino for Production!! How to Interface an LCD on the ARM Microcontroller Part 2
17. Arduino for Production!! How to Interface an LCD to an ARM Microcontroller Part 3
18. Arduino for Production!! How to Interface an LCD to the ARM Microcontroller Part 4